Low Carb Living



What do you need to know to successfully eat low carb for life?

Dr Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, knows more about this than almost anybody. He has researched adaptation to very low carb diets (and exercise) for a long time. Here he shares this knowledge, as well as insights from traditional cultures who never ever ate a lot of carbs.

Dr Phinney’s book “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living”:
http://www.amazon.com/Art-Science-Low-Carbohydrate-Living/dp/0983490708

More for your health:
http://www.DietDoctor.com

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33 Replies to “Low Carb Living”

  1. Andrew McLean

    Who is interviewing here? James Earl Jones?
    Hey James / Darth…. Stop interrupting Phinney – let him talk…. If you already know all this stuff why bother interviewing – why not just tell us yourself and save the good mans time….

  2. Stewart Edmunds

    This particular “fizy unique plan” diet program was such an simple way for me to burn 16 pounds in the short a couple weeks I have been following it. Know more about the “fizy unique plan” just by searching it on Google.

  3. Paul Buckland

    At last I`ve discovered a helpful guide to dieting which is very easy to follow and simple to read through. It turned out one of the only diet programs I have participated in that has gave me any results, which I have slipped nearly 18 lbs. Google "vivi awesome plan" right now.

  4. Kevin Eddinger

    Who in the world is conducting this interview? He is not only rude, in continually interrupting the subject doctor with inane questions, but frustrating anyone interested in what the doctor says by attempting (unsuccessfully) to interject his own "intelligence" into the discussion. The interviewer should just go off somewhere and talk to himself and let the doctor discuss this important subject.

  5. milkweedsage

    CORRECTION the first nations and Metis made pemmican by mixing the powdered meat with the fat and either carried dried berries with them or commonly mixed in. in evergreen forests such as many places around lake winnipeg there were, and still are, huge areas where wild blueberries grow. these are more flavourful and nutritious than cultivated berries and are still highly prized. other sources of vitamin C include high bush cranberries, buffalo berries, wild strawberries, currants, and other fruits. when fruit is not available make a tea of dried rose hips and/or freshly picked spruce. game animals feeding on the above also have vitamin C within the tissues as well, such as after the bison eat the buffalo berries in September.

  6. Katina Jenkins

    I googled about "fizy unique plan" & started pursuing this guide minutely. The result had been quite wonderful. You might be amazed to realize that I dropped around 13.5 lbs just simply in a few days.

  7. My Thoughts

    I believe on low carb but still can't undestand high fat because high fat means high protein.
    You need to eat olive oil and butter to achieve 80% fat 15% protein and 5% carb.

    I don't understand how he can do that?

  8. Jefferdaughter

    Correction: Properly finished 'grassfed' beef will have as much fat as grain finished (aka fattened) beef. It is true that too many 'grassfed' beef cattle are harvested before being properly finished/fattened. Ideally you can find someone in your area raising beef on 100% forage diets (pasture, and in winter hay, and/or grass hay aka 'grasslage').
    If you travel to the farm, look for blocky cattlebuild low to the ground. Smaller, shorter cattle fatten more easily on grass. Big, tall cattle with long legs are almost impossible to fatten on pasture alone – they either need grain, or their beef will be too lean for a keto diet.
    Pork and lamb are two great sources of quality fats- if raised and finished outdoors on pasture. Lamb is easy to fatten on pasture alone, and the taste and nutrition is superior to feedlot lamb.
    Most pork gets some grain, but there are people doing a great job raising pigs/hogs outside on pasture, and/or brush and woodlot supplemented with some dairy and fruit & veg. Sugar Hill in VT is one example, but everyone should look around in their area and find small-scale farmers raising happy, healthy animals- naturally.

  9. Peter Piper

    I've been on a high fat, low carb, NO sweets diet my entire life and I can tell you that I have never been ill a day in my life. But I'm lucky… even as a child if I ate something sweet, I would throw up. I do not like the taste of sweet foods but I like lard and fatty meats so I'm good to go.

  10. TheKiso

    When you're on a low carb diet to lose weight, should the diet then also consist of low-carb/moderate protein/high fat? Or is the high fat part only when most of the undesired body fat is burned and you're now maintaining?

  11. Kathleen Blizzard

    Could you hypothesize that the threshold for development of scurvy is much higher if there is less demand for antioxidants (like Vitamin C) due to less inflammation associated with eating real food?

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